RYE

General Information

Product Information
This package contains Headline, an emulsifiable concentrate (EC). The active ingredient in Headline, pyraclostrobin, is a member of the strobilurin class of chemistry and is derived from a natural antifungal substance. Preventive applications optimize disease control, resulting in improved plant health. Overall increased plant health may result in an improvement in crop growth and crop quality as well as increased crop yields.

Information regarding the contents and levels of metals in this product is available on the Internet at http://www.aapfco.org/metals.htm.

To maximize disease control, apply Headline in a regularly scheduled protective spray program and use in a rotation program with other fungicides.

Because of its high specific activity, Headline has good residual activity against target fungi.

Headline is not for use in greenhouse or transplant production.

Mode of Action
Pyraclostrobin, the active ingredient of Headline, belongs to the group of respiration inhibitors classified by the U.S. EPA and Canada PMRA as Quinone Outside Inhibitors (QoI) or target site of action Group 11 fungicides.

Resistance Management
Headline is effective against pathogens resistant to fungicides with modes of action different from those of QoI fungicides (target site Group 11), such as dicarboximides, sterol inhibitors, benzimidazoles, or phenylamides.

Fungal isolates resistant to Group 11 fungicides, such as pyraclostrobin, azoxystrobin, fluoxastrobin, trifloxystrobin, and kresoxim-methyl, may eventually dominate the fungal population if Group 11 fungicides are used predominantly and repeatedly in the same field in successive years as the primary method of control for the targeted pathogen species. This may result in reduction of disease control by Headline or other Group 11 fungicides.

DO NOT exceed the maximum seasonal use rate or the total number of Headline applications per season and the maximum number of Headline applications stated in Restrictions and Limitations - All Crops and Table 2. Headline fungicide Crop-specific Requirements. Follow the label instructions for use of Headline or other target site of action Group 11 fungicides that have a similar site of action on the same pathogens.

When using a Group 11 fungicide as a solo product, the number of applications should be no more than 1/3 of the total number of fungicide applications per season.

In programs in which tank mixes or pre-mixes of a Group 11 fungicide with a fungicide of another group are utilized, the number of Group 11 fungicide (QoI)-containing applications should be no more than 1/2 of the total number of fungicide applications per season.

In programs in which applications of Group 11 fungicides are made with both solo products and mixtures, the number of Group 11 fungicide (Qol)-containing applications should be no more than 1/2 of the total number of fungicide applications per season.

In fungicide alternation programs of Group 11 (QoI)-containing fungicides with non-Group 11 fungicides of different modes of action, the maximum number of sequential applications stated in Restrictions and Limitations – All Crops and Table 2. HeadlineR fungicide Crop-specific Requirements must be alternated with at least an equal number of applications of a non-Group 11-containing fungicide prior to using the Group 11 (QoI)-containing fungicide again. For example, in cases where two sequential applications of a Group 11 (QoI)-containing fungicide are made, this block of applications should be followed by 2 or more applications of a non-Group 11-containing fungicide prior to using the Group 11 (QoI)-containing fungicide again.

Resistance Management Advisory
The following instructions may be considered to delay the development of fungicide resistance:

1. Tank mixtures - Use tank mixtures with effective fungicides from different target-site-of-action groups that are registered/permitted for the same use and that are effective against the pathogens of concern.

Use at least the minimum labeled rates of each fungicide in the tank mix.

2. IPM - Headline fungicide should be integrated into an overall disease and pest management program. Cultural practices known to reduce disease development should be followed. Consult your local extension specialist, certified crop advisor and/or BASF representative for additional IPM strategies established for your area. Headline may be used in agricultural extension advisory (disease forecasting) programs, which recommend application timing based on environmental factors favorable for disease development.

3. Monitoring - Monitor efficacy of all fungicides used in the disease management program against the targeted pathogen and record other factors that may influence fungicide performance and/or disease development. If a Group 11 target-site fungicide, such as Headline, appears to be less effective against a pathogen that it previously controlled or suppressed, contact a BASF representative, local extension specialist, or certified crop advisor for further investigation.

Cleaning Spray Equipment
Spraying equipment must be cleaned thoroughly before and after applying this product, particularly if a product with the potential to injure crops was used prior to Headline.

Application Instructions
Apply rates of Headline as instructed Table 2. Headline fungicide Crop-specific Requirements section of the Headline container label. Apply Headline with ground sprayer, aerial equipment or through sprinkler irrigation equipment. Equipment should be checked frequently for calibration.

Under low-level disease conditions, the minimum application rates can be used while maximum application rates and shortened spray schedules are recommended for severe or threatening disease conditions.

Ground Application
Apply Headline in sufficient water to ensure thorough coverage of foliage, blooms, and fruit. Refer to Additives and Tank Mixing Information section for adjuvant or crop oil restrictions for ground applications in corn. See Table 2. HeadlineR fungicide Crop-specific Requirements for infurrow instructions.

Aerial Application
For aerial application in New York State, DO NOT apply within 100 feet of aquatic habitats (such as, but not limited to lakes, reservoirs, rivers, streams, marshes, ponds, estuaries, and commercial fish ponds).

Unless otherwise specified on this label, use no less than 5 gallons of spray solution per acre. For aerial application to citrus orchards, use no less than 10 gallons of spray solution per acre. DO NOT apply when conditions favor drift from target area.

Aerial application to alfalfa, barley, corn, oats, rye, soybeans, wheat and triticale Aerial applications of Headline may be made to alfalfa, barley, corn, oats, rye, soybeans, wheat, and triticale in water volumes of 2 or more gallons of spray solution per acre (gpa). The use of a crop oil or adjuvant may be used to improve spray coverage (see Additives and Tank Mixing Information section). Refer to the adjuvant product label for specific use directions and restrictions.

For optimum results in cases of high disease pressure, use a minimum spray volume of 4 gpa. Select spray nozzles, pumping pressure, and sprayer height to provide mediumto-fine spray droplets that penetrate throughout the crop canopy. Spray calibration must be conducted to confirm spray droplet sizes. Continue to monitor spray application (including weather conditions) to assure proper droplet size and canopy penetration.

Spray Drift Management
DO NOT spray when conditions favor drift beyond area intended for application. Conditions that may contribute to drift include thermal inversion, wind speed and direction, spray nozzle/pressure combinations, spray droplet size, temperature/humidity, etc. Contact your state extension agent for spray drift prevention guidelines in your area. All aerial and ground application equipment must be properly maintained and calibrated using appropriate carriers. Avoiding spray drift at the application site is the responsibility of the applicator.

Aerial Application Methods and Equipment The interaction of many equipment- and weather-related factors determines the potential for spray drift. The applicator and the grower are responsible for considering all these factors when making decisions.

DO NOT apply under circumstances where possible drift to unprotected persons, to food, forage, or other plantings that might be damaged, or crops thereof rendered unfit for sale, use or consumption can occur.

DO NOT release spray at a height greater than 10 feet above the crop canopy unless a greater height is required for aircraft safety.

The following drift management requirements must be followed to avoid off-target drift movement from aerial applications to agricultural field crops. These requirements DO NOT apply to forestry applications, public health uses or to applications using dry formulations.

1. The distance of the outermost nozzles on the boom must not exceed 3/4 the length of the wingspan or rotor.
2. Nozzles must always point backward parallel with the airstream and never be pointed downward more than 45 degrees.

Where states have more stringent regulations, they must be observed. The applicator must be familiar with and take into account the information covered in the aerial drift reduction advisory information.

Directions For Use Through Sprinkler Irrigation Systems

Sprayer Preparation
Chemical tank and injector system should be thoroughly cleaned. Flush system with clean water.

Application Instructions
Apply HeadlineR fungicide at rates and timings as required in this label.

Sprinkler Irrigation Applications Use Precautions
- Apply this product only through sprinkler irrigation systems including center pivot, lateral move, end tow, side (wheel) roll, traveler, big gun, solid set, or hand move irrigation systems. DO NOT apply this product through any other type of irrigation system.
- Add this product to the pesticide supply tank containing sufficient water to maintain a continuous flow by the injection equipment. In continuous moving systems, inject this product/water mixture continuously, applying the labeled rate per acre for that crop. DO NOT exceed 1/2 inch (13,577 gallons) per acre. In stationary or noncontinuous moving systems, inject the product/water mixture in the last 15 to 30 minutes of each set allowing sufficient time for all of the required pesticide to be applied by all the sprinkler heads and applying the labeled rate per acre for that crop. DO NOT apply when wind speed favors drift beyond the area intended for treatment. Crop injury, lack of effectiveness, or illegal pesticide residues in the crop can result from non-uniform distribution of treated water. Thorough coverage of foliage is required for good control. Good agitation should be maintained during the entire application period.
- If you have questions about calibration, you should contact state extension service specialists, equipment manufacturers or other experts.
- The system must contain a functional check valve, vacuum-relief valve, and low-pressure drain appropriately located on the irrigation pipeline to prevent water-source contamination from backflow.
- The pesticide injection pipeline must contain a functional, automatic, quick-closing check valve to prevent the flow of fluid back toward the injection pump.
- The pesticide injection pipeline must also contain a functional, normally closed, solenoid-operated valve located on the intake side of the injection pump and connected to the system interlock to prevent fluid from being withdrawn from the supply tank when the irrigation system is either automatically or manually shut down.
- The system must contain functional interlocking controls to automatically shut off the pesticide-injection pump when the water pump motor stops.
- The irrigation line or water pump must include a functional pressure switch that will stop the water pump motor when the water pressure decreases to the point where pesticide distribution is adversely affected.
- Systems must use a metering pump, such as a positive displacement injection pump (e.g. diaphragm pump), effectively designed and constructed of materials that are compatible with pesticides and capable of being fitted with a system interlock.
- Allow sufficient time for pesticide to be flushed through all lines and all nozzles before turning off irrigation water. A person knowledgeable of the chemigation system and responsible for its operation, or under supervision of the responsible person, shall shut the system down and make necessary adjustments should the need arise.
- DO NOT connect an irrigation system (including greenhouse systems) used for pesticide application to a public water system unless the pesticide label-prescribed safety devices for public water systems are in place.

Specific Instructions for Public Water Systems:
1. Public water system means a system for the provision to the public of piped water for human consumption if such system has at least 15 service connections or regularly serves an average of at least 25 individuals daily at least 60 days out of the year.
2. Chemigation systems connected to public water systems must contain a functional, reduced-pressure zone, backflow preventer (RPZ) or the functional equivalent in the water supply line upstream from the point of pesticide introduction. As an option to the RPZ, the water from the public water system should be discharged into a reservoir tank prior to pesticide introduction. There shall be a complete physical break (air gap) between the outlet end of the fill pipe and the top or overflow rim of the reservoir tank of at least twice the inside diameter of the fill pipe.
3. The pesticide injection pipeline must contain a functional, automatic, quick-closing check valve to prevent the flow of fluid back toward the injection pump.
4. The pesticide injection pipeline must contain a functional, normally closed, solenoid-operated valve located on the intake side of the injection pump and connected to the system interlock to prevent fluid from being withdrawn from the supply tank when the irrigation system is either automatically or manually shut down.
5. The system must contain functional interlocking controls to automatically shut off the pesticide injection pump when the water pump motor stops, or in cases where there is no water pump, when the water pressure decreases to the point where pesticide distribution is adversely affected.
6. Systems must use a metering pump, such as a positive displacement injection pump (e.g. diaphragm pump), effectively designed and constructed of materials that are compatible with pesticides and capable of being fitted with a system interlock.

Restrictions and Limitations - All Crops
- DO NOT exceed the maximum product rate (fl ozs/A) per year (season), the maximum rate per application, or the total number of applications of Headline fungicide per year (season) as stated in Table 1. Headline fungicide Restrictions and Limitations Overview and Table 2. Headline fungicide Crop-specific Requirements. Preharvest interval (PHI) restrictions are also included in these tables.
- DO NOT use Headline in greenhouse or transplant production.
- For aerial application in New York State, DO NOT apply within 100 feet of aquatic habitats (such as, but not limited to lakes, reservoirs, rivers, streams, marshes, ponds, estuaries, and commercial fish ponds).

Crop Rotation Restriction
Crops listed on the Headline, Cabrio EG fungicide and Pristine fungicide labels may be planted immediately following the last application. For all other crops, DO NOT plant sooner than 14 days after the last application.

Ground Application Directed or Banded Sprays
The application rates shown in the following tables pertain to both aerial and ground (broadcast) methods of application. Headline may also be applied as a directed or banded spray over the rows or plant beds with alleys or row middles left unsprayed. For such uses, reduce the rate of Headline in proportion to the area actually sprayed. This adjustment is necessary to prevent applying the product at use rates higher than permitted on this label.

Use the following formula in the label to determine the broadcast equivalent rate for doing directed or banded sprays.

Limitations, Restrictions, and Exceptions

RYE

Maximum Number of Sequential Foliar Applications: 2

- Apply no later than 50% head emergence (Feekes 10.3, Zadok's 55)

Application Directions. Begin applications of Headline prior to disease development. To maximize yields in cereals, it is important to protect the flag leaf. Apply Headline immediately after flag leaf emergence for optimum results.

Headline does not control Fusarium head blight (head scab) or prevent the reductions in grain quality that can result from this disease. When head blight is a concern, growers should manage this disease with fungicides that are labeled for and effective in managing this disease, and with cultural practices like crop rotation and plowing to reduce crop residues that serve as an inoculum source.

No livestock feeding restrictions.

Resistance Management. To limit the potential for development of resistance, DO NOT apply more than 0.29 lb ai pyraclostrobin (= 18 fl ozs Headline) per acre per season.

DO NOT make more than two (2) sequential applications of Headline before alternating to a labeled non-Group 11 fungicide with a different mode of action.

- For early season control of leaf spot and Septoria leaf and glume blotch when conditions favor disease development, apply 3 to 6 fl ozs per acre of Headline either in combination with a herbicide application or when conditions favor disease development. When the 3 to 6 fl ozs early season application rate is used, a second application of Headline may be required to protect the emerged flag leaf. Environmental conditions for disease or current disease pressure at the time of flag-leaf emergence should be used to determine the Headline rate for the second application. For high disease pressure, use the higher rate of Headline. Early season control is not registered for use in California.

- Aerial application is permitted for all labeled crops. For aerial application in New York State, DO NOT apply within 100 feet of aquatic habitats (such as, but not limited to lakes, reservoirs, rivers, streams, marshes, ponds, estuaries, and commercial fish ponds).

Restricted Entry Interval

12 hours